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Employment Litigation Archives

Court says Grubhub driver is independent contractor, not employee

Here at Duggan Law Corporation, we advise California employers about classifying workers as either independent contractors or employees. The answer is significant to both parties because if the person is an employee, he or she is subject to applicable California and federal labor and employment laws governing overtime, minimum wage, workers' compensation eligibility and more.

Bill would extend time to file state sexual harassment complaints

California, along with the rest of America, is experiencing an explosion of awareness about sexual harassment in the workplace, as more people come forward to publicly report their own stories. Employers of all types and sizes in the state are understandably concerned about protecting their own employees and keeping their workplaces in compliance with state and federal laws against illegal discrimination and harassment.

5 end-of-year considerations for California employers

Employers have plenty to think about as the year wraps up, from hosting safe employee holiday parties to managing year-end payroll. However, California employers should also take some time to make sure they'll be in compliance with all the new state employment laws that will go into effect in the beginning of 2018. Here are five things to pay attention to.

Under new law, employers can’t ask applicants about past salaries

How do you determine what to pay new hires? While some employers have set wages for certain positions, starting salaries are often negotiable. To gauge what salary applicants may be expecting, some employers include questions about past salaries on job applications. Starting January 1, this practice will be illegal in California.

What questions are off-limits on job applications in California?

At a time when it is easy to find personal information about most people online, it might seem like any question is fair game for a job application. However, while many aspects of job applications are left to the discretion of employers, there are also things California law prevents employers from asking applicants about.

Duggan Law Corporation Attorneys Named To Super Lawyers Lists

We are proud to announce that four of the attorneys at Duggan Law Corporation were recently recognized for their achievements by Super Lawyers, a rating service of outstanding lawyers who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement.

Are your workplace postings up-to-date?

From minimum wage notices to no smoking signs, California employers must display a wide variety of information in a place where all employees can see it. The California Department of Industrial Relations regulates the type of information employers are required to post – including laws and regulations covering workplace health and safety, whistleblower protection, sick leave and much more – as well as the manner in which postings are displayed.

What California's New Parental Leave Law Means For Employers

Last week, Gov. Jerry Brown signed the New Parent Leave Act into law, which expands California's parental leave law to include bonding time after the birth, adoption, or foster placement of a child for adoption for new parents. As many as 2.8 million employees may be affected by the new law, according to The Sacramento Bee. What does this mean for their employers?

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