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Posts tagged "employment law"

Abiding by California's paystub regulations

Many sections within California's labor code aim to protect workers and set expectations for employers. Regardless of a business' size, employees have certain rights regarding the payment they receive, including how employers must communicate payment. To properly document wages, employers must provide complete, accurate paystubs each time that the wages are paid.

New law clarifies key terms in salary history inquiry ban

As many California employers are aware, state law now prevents employers from asking job applicants about their salary history or from using salary history to make decisions regarding job offers or starting salaries. As we discussed in a previous post, this new law, which went into effect on January 1, also requires that employers provide pay scale information to applicants upon reasonable request.

More employer responsibilities regarding national origin (part 3)

Today, we wrap up our conversation about new California regulations to keep employees and job applicants safe from national-origin discrimination. Having just taken effect on July 1, these rules describe how California employers can meet their related responsibilities.

New California rules on national-origin discrimination (part 2)

Today we continue our discussion about extensive amendments to California national-origin employment discrimination regulations that took effect on July 1, 2018. Duggan Law Corporation will be educating our employer clients about their legal responsibilities toward job applicants and employees under these new rules.

California national-origin rules go into effect July 1

California employers must become aware of sweeping new state anti-discrimination regulations taking effect on Sunday, July 1, 2018. While discrimination or harassment based on national origin as a protected class has long been illegal under state law, the new rules provide employers with more detailed direction about what constitutes national-origin discrimination.

San Francisco city attorney seeks Uber and Lyft hiring records

Legal news topics we recently reported on in two separate posts have come together in a third matter potentially significant to some Northern California employers. Specifically, on May 29, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera issued a news release announcing he issued subpoenas to transportation providers Lyft and Uber for personnel records.

EEOC settles sexual harassment and retaliation suit against Goodwill

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently issued a press release announcing an $850,000 settlement in a sexual harassment and retaliation suit against Goodwill Industries of the East Bay Area and an affiliated employer.

Pre-employment wages may not be used to justify paying women less than men: Ninth Circuit decides major Fresno case under the federal Equal Pay Act

All California employers have a legal responsibility to pay wages and salaries in nondiscriminatory fashion. We recently published a post about a new California law that took effect on January 1, 2018, that forbids employers from asking new hires - either orally or in writing - about their past salary levels or wage amounts.

Employee or contractor? Court watchers get whiplash

In March, we wrote about a new federal case interpreting California employment law on the question of whether a worker should be classified as an employee or an independent contractor. As we described, in that case about a Grubhub driver, the court found that under California's Borello test, Lawson, a driver who delivered food to Grubhub customers, was an independent contractor largely because Grubhub did not have the degree of control over his work that an employer would have.

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